Woman explains her s’mores experiment, which aims to make chocolate and marshmallow sandwich popular

Corporate s’mores are a delicacy enjoyed by millions across the country. But as demand for s’mores seems to be on the decline, one woman is trying to make it less common. On Saturday, Dawn…

Woman explains her s’mores experiment, which aims to make chocolate and marshmallow sandwich popular

Corporate s’mores are a delicacy enjoyed by millions across the country. But as demand for s’mores seems to be on the decline, one woman is trying to make it less common.

On Saturday, Dawn Tarfusser, a 56-year-old former chef from Erie, Pennsylvania, made her first s’mores out of blocks on the sidewalk outside a deli — and was taken aback by how many of her neighbors had noticed her action. She wanted to raise awareness of a science experiment, named S’moresIsWhatWeDo, which has been organized by the nonprofit Food Tank and aims to change the food system by helping people experiment with new foods. Tarfusser wants Americans to have more opportunities to enjoy novel flavors and tastes, such as s’mores, so that it’s no longer a novelty meal.

https://t.co/i0i8Wf0cDl A woman and her s’mores are all we need right now! pic.twitter.com/BSl1BJ7QQt — Food Tank (@FoodTankOrg) April 7, 2018

The research guide provides activities that are scientific and enjoyable to try, including chocolate and coconut milk s’mores and fire s’mores. (It also has a fun diagram that shows just how long it takes to make s’mores, just so people can prepare the meal at home. According to the National S’mores Society, there are 20 million s’mores enthusiasts in the U.S.)

Many are hopeful that Tarfusser’s s’mores project will inspire people to put new foods into their diets, as well as ask for more information about different products.

Thank you Dawn Tarfusser for showing us what s’mores is really all about. https://t.co/gsRaOSkR9K — Food Tank (@FoodTankOrg) April 14, 2018

“It’s not just about making s’mores, it’s about wanting to share it,” Tarfusser told HuffPost. “That way, you might not be on the sidewalk talking about it for the next 10 years, but maybe you’ll be telling someone about the one s’mores you did that made your childhood.”

The No. 1 reason why people don’t use science to combat climate change is that they can’t easily see the sources of chemicals they’re consuming, according to a study by Food Tank and Wonkblog. Understanding ingredients may allow consumers to make decisions that affect the food they eat, regardless of whether they are aware of the realities of how many chemicals are in their daily food.

“The people we’re trying to help are not very close to a scientist,” Tarfusser said. “The hope is that people are taking it up, making it a habit for their families and setting it up for the future.”

Read the full story at HuffPost.

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